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Quelle: Bombardier

21 Additional Trams to Berlin

Rail technology leader Bombardier Transportation announced today that it will provide an additional 21 BOMBARDIER FLEXITY Berlin trams to the German capital. This fourth call off exercises all options from the framework agreement signed with Berlin Transport Authority (BVG) in 2006 for a maximum of 210 vehicles. The order is valued at approximately 71 million euro ($ 76 million US). Maintaining one of the biggest tram networks in the world and the biggest tram network in Germany in a rapidly growing city, BVG will use the additional FLEXITY 100% low-floor trams to increase capacity and meet the demands of a rising passenger base.

To date, 137 Bombardier FLEXITY trams have been delivered, on-time and to the satisfaction of both customer BVG and its passengers. Since entering service in 2011, BVG’s FLEXITY fleet has reliably performed 29 million kilometers with 132 vehicles in operation as a key part of Berlin’s public transportation offering.

In 2006 BVG ordered four pre-series vehicles for testing of suitability for series production. 99 trams were ordered in 2009, 39 more trams in 2012 and another 47 vehicles in 2015. To enhance their fleet performance, BVG is also testing Bombardier’s remote diagnosis system myBTfleet on four of their FLEXITY trams. The system enables users to optimize service and maintenance through real-time data gathered directly from the vehicle.

To date, more than 1,600 FLEXITY 100% low-floor trams have been sold throughout Europe, Asia, Australia and North America.

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